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In response to Mark Zuckerberg Wanting Children Under 13 to Be Able to Join Facebook

| May 20, 2011 | Comments (1)
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Mark_zuckerberg_100610-05 Article being referenced: Zuckerberg: Kids under 13 Should Be Allowed on Facebook

Plain and simple, Facebook isn’t a place for children.

As I’ve shared in the past, and as many of us know – the content and culture is adult-intended. While I agree with Mark, children should benefit from social media, Facebook just isn’t the place.

While it may sound cliche, we parents know that until you have a child, you just don’t understand the importance of that child’s safety and well-being. Since Mark’s not yet a parent, it’s obvious that he doesn’t understand this.  After all, I know he wouldn’t want his children offline being exposed to, yet alone “playing”, smash or pass or spending time with the NAMBLA folks for example; yet he knowingly allows this to happen online. A parent would never do the same. The online world for our children, I believe, deserves as many of the same offline safeguards as technically and humanly possible.

Just like in education, to achieve their full potential, a child needs to be a part of a constructive, age-appropriate, respectful, engaging and rewarding environment.  While Facebook delivers many benefits to adults, it simply lacks these benefits for our children.

I recommend instead of “taking on the fight” specific to COPPA, it’d be much better to simply follow the law or work with Yoursphere.

Yoursphere’s COPPA Compliancy. 

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Category: Facebook, Privacy, Safety

Comments (1)

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  1. aisha says:

    I think if you teach your children about internet safety, and set up privacy settings FB can be an okay place for them.
    My kids now have FB. They mostly play the games, but I get copies of their email, and they are only allowed to friend family and friends they actually know.
    I have their passwords, and check what they are doing, and we discuss the importance of it.
    I think the most important thing is to keep open lines of communication. Kids can sneak and do things we are not aware of. But if you are aware of what they are doing, you have better access to protect them.
    FB has games and access to family adults that my kids want to interact with.

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